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Full text of "Handbook Of Chemical Engineering - I"

SECTION IV
THE TRANSPORTATION OF GASES
BY DONALD M. LmoELL1
The transportation of gases may be roughly divided into the problems involving the use of air piped under more or less pressure, those of the removal of waste industrial gases by chimneys, and the carriage of highly-compressed gases in tanks.2
For low pressures coming under the first case, fans will ordinarily be used for pressures up to 16 oz. They are particularly used for ventilation, for moving shavings or other light material, and for supplying the blast in small foundry cupolas. Jet blowers may also be used for low pressures. Rotary blowers are ordinarily used for pressures from 1 to 10 lb., and piston compressors are used for still higher pressures and where positive action must be secured. Centrifugal compressors (turbo-blowers) are now also used for high-pressure work—an innovation of the last few years.
TABLE 1.—WEIGHT OF AIR AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES, PRESSURES, AND DEGREES
OF HUMIDITY
Tempera-	Weight of 1 cu.	Increase or de-	Increase or de-	Decrease of
ture,	ft. of dry air (at	crease of weight	crease of weight	weight for each
degrees	14 lb. per square	for each 0.1 lb.	for each 1 in. of	10 per cent in-
Fahren-	inch or 28.5 in.	change in pres-	Hg. change of	crease in relative
heit	of Hg.), pounds	sure, pounds	pressure, pounds	humidity, pounds
32	0.07688	0.000549	0.002698	0.000019
35	0.07642	0.000546	0.002681	0.000021
40	0.07565	0.000540	0.002654	0.000025
45	0.07490	0.000535	0.002628	0.000030
50	0.07417	0.000530	0.002602	0.000035
55	0.07340	0.000525	0 . 002580	0 . 000040
60	0.07272	0.000520	0.002554	0.000051
65	0.07203	0.000515	0.002530	0.000059
70	0.07134	0.000510	0.002506	0.000070
75	0.07068	0 . 000505	0 . 002482	0.000081
80	0.07003	0.000500	0.002457	0.000095
85	0.06938	0.000495	0.002432	0.000111
90	0.06875	0.000490	0.002408	0.000127
95	0.06811	0.000485	0.002384	0.000147
100	0.06752	0.000480	0.002359	0.000172
105	0.06694	0 . 000475	0.002334	0.000199
iWeld & Liddell, Engineers and Economists, 2 Rector St., N. Y.
2 Acknowledgment is here made to Marks' "Mechanical Engineers' Handbook" and to the "Standard Handbook for Electrical Engineers" for much of the material in this chapter. The individuals whose work was thus used are: H. J. Thorkelson, L. C. Loewenstein, E. E. Williams, Joseph H. Brown, Jr., and R. J. S. Pigott.—EDITOR.
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